Social Justice

The Intent

In solidarity with the Black Lives Matter movement and BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, People of Color), we are dedicated to working individually and collectively through education, research, resource sharing, and conversation to find out what it means to be an anti-racist and an effective ally and find ways we can help to further the cause of racial equality and social justice. We will incorporate anti-racism into our core purpose by identifying the relationship between climate justice and social justice.

Established June 2020.

What's New

Activities, Past and Present

Some of the specific actions we are currently working on:

  • The Social Justice L2020 Work Group is meeting bi-monthly via zoom or similar.
  • Viewing the Generation Movement Social Justice webinars and possibly creating a follow up discussion with Local 20/20 members and East Jefferson County citizens.
  • Reading and discuss relevant media: articles, books, videos, etc.
  • Compiling a list of BIPOC organizations and businesses to support.
  • Reading the work, listen to, and view the art of BIPOC.
  • Posting articles and book annotations on Local 20/20 Resiliency Readings on the Weekly Announcements

 

Organizations to Support

Jefferson County Anti-Racist Fund

Black Owned Businesses in Jefferson County (list from BLM Jefferson County https://www.facebook.com/104236524655701/posts/128992158846804/)

Artist Spotlight

This section features artists and writers from the BIPOC community, local or transnational. We hope you enjoy viewing, reading and listening.  Artist and activist Robin Sigo (Suquamish) explained that one of the things that white people can do to support the indigenous community is to support their work!  “Buy a pair of our earrings, our crafts, read the books written by indigenous authors.”

Artist Spotlight: Micah Wallace

“I use nontraditional materials to weave traditional Onondaga and Micmac basketry forms that comment on Indigenous life in the twenty-first century. I began making “film” baskets in 1985 when I was teaching film theory with filmmaker Marge Brown at Evergreen State College. She suggested that I do a film project. I asked our students for out-takes from their projects and wove my first film basket, which I presented to Marge at the end of the quarter. Film was an interesting material, and I enjoyed the notion of recycling it and gaining control over a medium historically used by both Hollywood and documentary filmmakers to stereotype American Indians. …”

Artist Spotlight: Gail Tremblay

“I use nontraditional materials to weave traditional Onondaga and Micmac basketry forms that comment on Indigenous life in the twenty-first century. I began making “film” baskets in 1985 when I was teaching film theory with filmmaker Marge Brown at Evergreen State College. She suggested that I do a film project. I asked our students for out-takes from their projects and wove my first film basket, which I presented to Marge at the end of the quarter. Film was an interesting material, and I enjoyed the notion of recycling it and gaining control over a medium historically used by both Hollywood and documentary filmmakers to stereotype American Indians. …”

Opportunities to Participate

Follow along with us as we educate ourselves.  This is what we’re reading, listening to, and viewing.

Music

Videos

  • Reckoning KPTZ Presents: A Conversation between BIPOC and Law Enforcement in Jefferson County on Thursday, July 30, 2020 from 7-9pm on KPTZ 91.9FM Port Townsend. This is a radio broadcast of a moderated panel discussion with local Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC) and Jefferson County Sheriff Joe Nole, a collaborative effort between local BIPOC community representatives, Jefferson County Commissioner Kate Dean, the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Department, and KPTZ Radio.
  • Radical Monarchs: A group of tween girls chant into megaphones, marching in the San Francisco TransMarch. Holding clenched fists high, they wear brown berets and vests showcasing colorful badges like “Black Lives Matter” and “Radical Beauty.” Meet the Radical Monarchs, a group of young girls of color at the front lines of social justice.
  • Robin DiAngelo: White Fragility: Why It’s So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism by Robin DiAngelo
  • Pachamama Alliance: Voices of Indigenous Women: The Teachings of our Current Crises
    On August 10, 2020, Pachamama Alliance hosted Voices of Indigenous Women: The Teachings of our Current Crises in honor of International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples. Hear a panel of Indigenous women from the Americas share perspectives from their traditions and experiences on the interconnectedness of all life as it relates to the timely conversation around intersectional environmentalism: the intersection of injustices happening to people and the Earth.

Articles

Characteristics of White Supremacy

An excerpt from Dismantling Racism: A Workbook for Social Change Groups, by Kenneth Jones and Tema Okun, ChangeWork, 2001, this contains “a list of characteristics of white supremacy culture which show up in our organizations. Culture is powerful precisely because it is so present and at the same time so very difficult to name or identify. The characteristics listed below are damaging because they are used as norms and standards without being pro-actively named or chosen by the group. They are damaging because they promote white supremacy thinking. They are damaging to both people of color and to white people. Organizations that are people of color-led or a majority people of color can also demonstrate many damaging characteristics of white supremacy culture.” https://www.showingupforracialjustice.org/white-supremacy-culture-characteristics.html

 

What Good Is Clean Air If People Can’t Breathe? 

7-minute read from YES Magazine notes: “Racism is inherent to the environmental movement because it’s inherent to everything.” Starting out from a first person story perspective, this article shares how climate change and racism are part of the same systemic problem.  The second half of the article is chock full of links and references to further reading and further understanding.

Principals for Environmental and Climate Justice
These principles from Front and Centered point out that the very populations who are most impacted by the ill effects of pollution, climate change, and resource extraction etc., are either left out of the conversation or not heard at all when it comes to making policy that would protect their communities from these ill effects. The principles listed are ways to equalize the platform so that all communities can be heard and included in the process of policy making that directly affects the communities’ well being.

Are There Two Different Versions of Environmentalism, One “White” One “Black”? 

It’s sad that this Grist article from 2014 is still relevant today.  A reminder of some of the historical roots of different perspectives of what “environment” means and talks about barriers and challenges that people of color endured and continue to endure to just be counted and heard when it comes to climate justice.

Books

  • Indigenous People’s History of the United States by Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz
  • People’s History of the United States by Howard Zinn
  • White Fragility by Robin DiAngelo

Contact Information

Contact us at socialjustice@l2020.org.